2024 ACCA International exhibition

Laure Provoust: Oui Move In You 

The first major Australian survey of work by celebrated French artist Laure Prouvost opens at ACCA on 23 March.  

Continuing the annual ACCA International series of solo exhibitions by influential artists on the international stage, the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art will present Oui Move in You, a major solo exhibition by Laure Prouvost. Encompassing new commissions and a survey of existing work over the past decade, the exhibition will transform ACCA’s unique architecture into a labyrinthine and other-worldly environment, introducing Australian audiences to the imaginative, absorbing and frequently absurdist hallmarks of Prouvost’s diverse artistic practice. 

Acknowledging the radical, experimental, and pathfinding figures who came before her, Oui Move In You conceptually explores the roles and legacies of grandmother and grandfather, the maternal spaces of mother and child, and contemporary social spaces in which humans commune with the natural world. The exhibition is composed as a celebration of liberation and imagination, the sensual and sensuous, being and belonging, care and connection. Taking audiences on a journey from the subterranean realm of the underground and the subconscious, opening into the bodily and earthly realm exploring sensuality, desire and the fecundity of nature, the exhibition culminates with a release into the sky and celestial plains of weight and weightlessness, lightness and gravity. 

Laure Prouvost is among the most celebrated artists on the contemporary international art scene, with ACCA’s exhibition the first major presentation of the artist’s work in Australia. Born in 1978 in Lille, France, Prouvost lives and works in Brussels, Belgium. Prouvost graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Central Saint Martins (London, 2002) and a Master of Fine Arts from Goldsmiths College (London, 2010). Prouvost represented France at the 58th International Art Exhibition at the Venice Biennial in 2019. She was the recipient of the prestigious Turner Prize in 2013 and the MaxMara Art Prize for Women in 2011. Prouvost has recently presented solo exhibitions at Remai Modern (Saskatoon, Canada 2023); Nasjonalmuseet (Oslo, Norway, 2022); Longlati Foundation (Shanghai China, 2022); and Kunsthal Charlottenborg (Copenhagen, Denmark, 2021), which included a major new video work co-commissioned with ACCA; as well as a wide range of public art and performance projects. 

A limited-edition artist’s book will be published to coincide with the exhibition, including contributions from fellow artists, friends and collaborators across the globe, paying homage to grandmothers, artistic matriarchs, ancestors, inspirational elders and forebears. 

An abridged version of the exhibition will tour to Perth Institute of Contemporary Art in 2025.

Laure Provoust: Oui Move In You
Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA)
23 March – 10 June 2024 
Curators: Max Delany and Annika Kristensen

Touring to Perth Institute of Contemporary Art in 2025 

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art 
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia

Opening hours:
Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm, Free entry
acca.melbourne
#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri Woiwurrung people as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, along with the neighbouring Boonwurrung, Bunurong, and wider Kulin Nation. We acknowledge their longstanding and continuing care for Country and we recognise First Peoples art and cultural practice has been thriving here for millennia. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

2024 ACCA Artistic Program

ACCA is pleased to announce its 2024 artistic program, encompassing a quarterly, seasonally-based program of exhibitions, alongside offsite, online, touring and special projects, supported by a dynamic series of education and public programs. Our 2024 program includes the following keynote projects.

From the other side
9 December 2023– 3 March, 2024

Artists: Naomi Blacklock, Mia Boe, Louise Bourgeois, Cybele Cox, Theron Debris, Karla Dickens, Lonnie Hutchinson, Naomi Kantjuriny, Minyoung Kim, Maria Kozic, Jemima Lucas, Clare Milledge, Tracey Moffatt, Julia Robinson, Marianna Simnett, Heather B. Swann, Suzan Pitt, Kellie Wells, and Zamara Zamara

From the other side integrates historical and contemporary works, alongside new commissions that draw upon horror’s capacity to transgress and destabilise forms of power and subjugation. The exhibition summons the impulse for rage and revenge, while embracing feelings of vulnerability and unease. From the other sidecasts a lens upon feminist, queer and non-binary subjectivities to consider the transgressive pleasures and liberations of horror, as makers, masters and consumers of the genre.

Laure Prouvost: Oui Move In You
23 March – 10 June 2024

Oui Move In You is a major exhibition featuring the work of Laure Prouvost (born Lille, 1978). Encompassing new commissions and a survey of work over the past decade, the exhibition will transform ACCA into a labyrinthine and other-worldly environment, immersing audiences in the imaginative, absorbing and frequently absurdist hallmarks of Prouvost’s diverse artistic practice.

Oui Move In You explores the roles and legacies of grandmother and grandfather, the maternal spaces of mother and child, and contemporary social spaces in which humans commune with the natural world. Taking audiences on a journey from the subterranean realm of the underground and the subconscious, opening into the bodily and earthly realm exploring sensuality, desire and the fecundity of nature, the exhibition culminates with a release into the sky and celestial plains of weight and weightlessness, lightness and gravity.

Future Remains: The 2024 Macfarlane Commissions
29 June – 1 September 2024

Artists: Kim Ah Sam, Andy Butler, Teelah George, Alexandra Peters, Nicholas Smith, Joel Sherwood Spring and Salote Tawale

Future Remains: The 2024 Macfarlane Commissions is the fourth edition of a multi-year partnership that supports ambitious new projects by emerging to mid-career artists. This edition showcases artists who variously reclaim, restage and reframe specific material, cultural or ideological inheritances in an effort not only to better understand the past but open up new possibilities for our current and future worlds.

Engaging a broad range of historical reference points, from idiosyncratic personal and familial narratives, cultural and artistic lineages, to more official archives and collections, Future Remains reflects on the ways that the past reverberates in the present. The exhibition invites us to contemplate the gifts and burdens of these legacies, alongside the promise of their reconfiguration for the future. 

Tennant Creek Brio
21 September – 17 November 2024

Artist collective including members: Fabian Brown Japaljarri, Lindsay Nelson Jakamarra, Rupert Betheras, Joseph Williams Jangarrayi, Jimmy Frank Juppurla, Clifford Thompson Japaljarri, Simon Wilson Pitjara, Marcus Camphoo Kemarre

Tennant Creek Brio are an artist collective working on Warumungu Country, including contemporary artists from Northern Central Australia to Melbourne. The group first converged in 2016 when the artists initiated an outreach program at the local men’s centre (Anyinginyi Health Aboriginal Corporation). Since then, the Brio have continued their work, conjuring the haunting wounds of post-contact histories, the renewal and remaking of cultural practices, and the collaborative resilience of a frontier community.

As a group of charismatic outsiders working in an industrial estate on the outskirts of town—at once marginal figures and cultural leaders—the Brio fuse First Nations cultural traditions, the industrial materiality of the mining industry, and regional and global art influences to express and re-imagine their cross-cultural identities, and the reality of unresolved tensions between Indigenous and settler colonial cultures.

The Charge That Binds
7 December 2024 – 2 March 2025

The Charge That Binds presents new and recent works that celebrate the exuberance and beauty of a world composed of multifaceted, multispecies relations and pulses. The exhibition examines how, in the midst of planetary ecological crisis, artists are utilising this dynamic energy to remember, reimagine, and to foster new modes of relationality and connection beyond the extractive logic of capital.

The Charge That Binds emphasises our entanglement in a constellation of living networks not only to stress the ethics of kinship but to foreground collectivity and collaboration as vibrant political strategies. Accompanied by a series of experimental workshops, discussions, performances and pedagogical investigations, the exhibition presents an assembly of practices that celebrate and cultivate reciprocity, exchange, and interdependency across difference in both a poetic and pragmatic register.

Announcing Dr Terry Wu as ACCA’s new Chair

ACCA’s Board of Directors announced today that Dr Terry Wu will take on the role of Chair at ACCA. He follows John Denton, who steps down after thirteen years as Chair and two decades as a member of ACCA’s Board.

A member of the ACCA Board since 2019, Terry is a a long-standing arts advocate and supporter, and a leading plastic surgeon specialising in facial reconstruction.

‘I am honoured to take on this new role, and to cement the exceptionally important work John has done in steering ACCA through an enormous period of growth and change’, Terry said.

‘On behalf of the Board of Directors and the ACCA team, I thank John and applaud him for his exceptional contribution to ACCA, and to our wider community. As a Director of the internationally renowned architectural firm Denton Corker Marshall, John has helped shape the architectural and visual identity of Melbourne, but has also played a vitally important role supporting one of Melbourne’s – and Australia’s – most significant arts organisations.

‘We are so thankful for all he has done over the past two decades, as a longstanding and loyal donor, and a kind and generous leader, supporting ACCA with great vision, governance and advocacy’.

John Denton joined the ACCA Board in 2002 when it first moved into its award-winning building designed by Wood Marsh in Southbank. His retirement comes as ACCA celebrates 21 years at the heart of the Melbourne Arts Precinct, and 40 years as a leading producer of contemporary visual art and culture in Australia.

‘I am honoured to follow in John’s exceptional footsteps and to continue to work with the ACCA Board and team as it embraces new horizons and continues to build on the influential role it plays in the Australian visual arts ecology over the next 40 years and beyond. I’m especially excited to expand ACCA’s role as a platform for artists, through our ambitious and groundbreaking exhibitions and commissioning, our transformative education and public programs, and our strong community engagement,’ Terry said.

Dr Terry Wu is also a Board Member of ACMI (Australian Centre for the Moving Image), Science Gallery International (Dublin) and serves as a Member of Creative Australia’s Venice Biennale Ambassadors Council. He was formerly a Board Director of Heide Museum of Modern Art and the National Association of Visual Arts, and a member of the International Council of Tate (UK). As the son of an artist and writer, Terry is passionate about arts, culture and philanthropy and in 2019 was awarded the Emerging Philanthropy Leadership Award by Creative Partnerships Australia.

Screams on Screen

Over two heart stopping nights in February (16th-17th), RMIT’s historic Capitol Theatre will become the spookiest place in Melbourne for Screams on Screen, a curated program at the interface of art/horror featuring live music, art, feature films, rarely seen experimental shorts, artist and director talks that celebrate the monstrous emotions and transgressive, rebellious forces that fuel the horror genre.

Screams on Screen has been co-organised with RMIT in association with ACCA’s current exhibition From the other side, which centres the fear of the monstrous- feminine to consider the pleasure and liberation of horror from feminist, queer and non-binary subjectivities.

The program includes a 10-year anniversary screening of one of the most influential Australian horror films of the 21st century, Jennifer Kent’s The Babadook , 2014, a selection of art/horror auteur David Lynch’s rarely screened earliest experimental shorts, 1967-68, as well as shorts from some of Australia’s finest contemporary artists, a digital restoration of Ann Turner’s Australian folk-horror cult classic Celia, 1989, and the first Iranian Vampire Western, Ana Lily Amirpour’s A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, 2014.

The program also includes a presentation of the sculptural works by multi- disciplinary artist Isabel Peppard and a live theremin performance by musician Roman Tucker. Creepy Cocktails served in the foyer.

‘Screams on Screen’ celebrates horror’s potential to empower social ‘otherness’ and project our darkest fantasies and social nightmares onto the big screen.

Screams on Screen: The Dark Desire Friday, 16 February, from 6:00pm

Art, screenings, music, talks. The Dark Desire features stories of impulse, longing, craving and lust.

Isabel Peppard, artworks in the foyer

Roman Tucker, live theremin performance and creepy cocktails in the Salon Talks to be announced

Experimental shorts

Liang Luscombe and Cara Benedetto, Leave, 2023

Leave uses puppetry to explore representations of Caucasian women and drunkenness in film and television. The stumbling woman, made famous in films and

TV shows such as Fatal Attraction, Fleabag, Killing Eve, and Single Drunk Female, appears as a part-human-part-puppet character trying to piece together the night before. ‘Leave’ explores the erotics of the relationship between puppeteer and puppet, showing the way the puppeteer supports and manipulates the puppet to ask questions about agency and intoxication within the body horror genre.

Drew Pettifer, Untitled (Gasp!), 2024

Untitled (Gasp!) intersperses moments from cinematic history where male-identifying characters gasp in fear. The syncopated rhythm of these spliced moments collate micro-challenges to expectations of masculinity and allude to queer histories of the horror genre.

Isabel Peppard, Butterflies, 2012

A young artist struggles to make a living selling her drawings at a train station. When a sinister businessman offers her a paying job the prospect seems inviting but the reality threatens to kill her imagination…Butterflies is a Gothic Fantasy stop-motion animation that speaks to the tension between art and capitalism and the struggle to preserve one’s creative soul.

David Lynch, The Alphabet, 1968

The Alphabet is an experimental short film featuring a sick woman’s nightmare involving living representations of the alphabet. Combining animation and live-action the film presents an absurdist nightmare where learning and fear are intertwined.

David Lynch, Six Men Getting Sick (Six Times), 1966

Lynch’s first exploration into film, Six Men Getting Sick (Six Times) was developed during his time at art school and presents a visceral and tongue-in-cheek metaphor about the process of expression and art marking.

Feature Film

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, 2014

A tale of love, loneliness and family ties, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night is set in the fictitious town of Bad City. Dubbed the first Iranian Vampire Western, Amirpour’s take of the blood-sucking archetype is anything but prescriptive.

Language: Persian | 104mins | USA

Screams on Screen: The Dark Domestic Saturday, 17 February, from 6:00pm

Australian horror double bill, The Babadook, 2014, Celia, 1989 and in conversation with director Ann Turner, art, and experimental shorts. The Dark Domestic exposes the horrors of suburbia and the fear of home invasion.

Kyle Edward Ball, Heck, 2020

A little kid wakes up in the middle of night to the sound of his mom’s television blaring.

Hayley Millar Baker, The Umbra, 2023

Illuminating the darkest and quietest part of the night when the veil to the physical and spiritual realms are at its thinnest, The Umbra unites the living with the ethereal through an occurrence of astral travel between an adolescent woman and a young spirit brought to physicality.The Umbra is a slow-cinema filmic work that centres female power and strength in reference to elements of the horror genre that is often focused on women’s psychosis.

The Babadook, 2014

This special screening of The Babadook celebrates the 10th anniversary of one of the most influential and internationally acclaimed Australian horror films of the 21st century. Jennifer Kent’s darkly disturbing feature debut starring Essie Davis set a new template for the haunted house subgenre, while also launching its supernatural bogeyman into the memeosphere: Mr Babadook has become one of the horror genre’s most iconic monstrous beings.

Language: English | 93mins | AU

Celia, 1989

A digital restoration by the National Film and Sound Archive of Ann Turner’s 1989 masterpiece revolving around the life of a creative and emotionally troubled young girl named Celia (Rebecca Smart). Set in 1950 Melbourne suburbia Celia’s upbringing is marked by her parents’ devout religious beliefs, which are intertwined with their own sexual frustrations and irrational fears surrounding the rise of communism. Finding solace in her vivid imagination, she conjures up images of malevolent creatures and peculiar phenomena as a means to conceal her insecurities.

Language: English | 103mins | AU

Screams on Screen is co-programmed by Jessica Balanzategui (RMIT’s School of Media and Communication and SIGN network lead), Elyse Goldfinch, Jessica Clark (ACCA) and proudly presented by RMIT Culture and SIGN at RMIT in partnership with ACCA and supported by City of Melbourne Annual Arts Grants.

Hayley Millar Baker’s The Umbra was commissioned by RISING for Shadow Spirit, curated by Kimberley Moulton.

Ann Turner’s Celia is courtesy of Umbrella Entertainment.

Ticketing Link: https://events.humanitix.com/screams-on-screen

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art 111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006 Melbourne, Australia

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm, Free entry acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca For further media information:

Katrina Hall Publicity/Communications 0421153046

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri Woiwurrung people as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, along with the neighbouring Boonwurrung, Bunurong, and wider Kulin Nation. We acknowledge their longstanding and continuing care for Country and we recognise First Peoples art and cultural practice has been thriving here for millennia. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

ACCA Statement in Support of Artists

ACCA is a platform for artists, and we fully support and respect their fundamental right to express their artistic and political views, without fear of retribution, in keeping with principles of freedom of cultural expression.

In keeping with our mission, vision and values, ACCA is equally a centre for the exchange of ideas, and we strive to create a safe and respectful space – for artists, audiences, our team, and the communities with whom we work – to create brave and at times challenging artistic works, and to engage in the conversations of our time.

In seeking to encourage cultural participation and debate, we aim to extend a duty of care and respect for the diverse perspectives which reflect our communities, whilst we resolutely stand against all forms of hate speech, bigotry and discrimination, including antisemitism and Islamophobia.

At this distressing time, we express our deepest sympathies to those affected by the devastating events in Gaza and Israel, which are deeply felt in our own communities. We join in calls for an end to violence and the pursuit of peace.

In this spirit we acknowledge the position of artists James Nguyen and Tamsen Hopkinson in relation to their current installation at ACCA and we respect their right to this action.

For further media information, please contact:

Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046

James Nguyen: Open Glossary

The second edition of the Copyright Agency Partnerships Commission, James Nguyen’s multi-lingual installation Open Glossary interrogates the politics of language, cultural exchange, activism and belonging.

Amongst other things, Nguyen will fill ACCA’s main hall with hundreds of white shirts, as a sensory and immersive sculptural work that probes the language of contemporary art and society more widely.

Born in Vietnam and based in Narrm (Melbourne), James Nguyen’s practice examines ways to decolonise and interrogate the politics of family history, translation, displacement and diaspora.

For Open Glossary, Nguyen and his collaborators, Tamsen Hopkinson (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Pāhauwera), Budi Sudarto, Kate ten Buuren (Taungurung) and Chris Xu, present dynamic installations, videos, performances and events across all four ACCA galleries, each carrying multi-lingual conversations on a range of contemporary issues including gender diversity and sexual identity, the linguistic and spiritual connections of Southeast Asia, First Nations Australian and Moana neighbours, as well as Land Rights and Indigenous Constitutional Recognition.

A central feature is the installation of white shirts, gathered from donations across Australia. Presented together these shirts evoke a range of touch points, from the political sculpture of Brazilian artist Lygia Pape, the Angel Ally corridors from Stonewall rallies and the Matthew Shepherd murder trials, the deregulation of the textiles and footwear industry in 1980s Australia, to Nguyen’s family sewing factory. This provisional structure is an intimate space for the public to encounter experiences of belonging and non-belonging from a range of LGBTQI+ migrants recently resettled to Australia, whose personal accounts were recorded in workshops facilitated in collaboration with Budi Sudarto. 

In the adjacent gallery space, a guard of white angels secures a safe space for queer communities, filled with messages of hope and A Queer Glossary – a collective multi-lingual translation project of queer terms for, and by, non-English speaking LGBTQI+ community members. This evolving glossary records the shifting and collective presence of multi-lingual queerness. 

In a separate project, James Nguyen stages an extended conversation with Māori artist and curator Tamsen Hopkinson. The work is a material and conceptual coming together, a manifestation of the shared term ‘Hui’, which resonates across Indo-Pacific and Moana Polynesian cultures. Conceived as a meeting space of cultural negotiation and exchange, ‘Hui’ continues the contemporary linguistic and artistic connections of two practitioners coming from Māori and Vietnamese traditions. 

In the final section of the exhibition, James Nguyen and First Nations artist and curator Kate ten Buuren have crafted an interactive space for young people to consider their relationship with Aboriginal and Torres Strait people in contemporary Australia. Furnished with zines, dioramas and costumes, this hands-on making-space encourages participants to craft their own stories in relation to Sovereignty, the Voice, Treaty and Care for Country. 

This project is presented in partnership with the Copyright Agency as part of the 2023 Copyright Agency Partnerships (CAP) Commission, supporting mid-career and established Australian visual artists to produce a major new commission. The first in the series was TextaQueen’s Bollywouldn’t at the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art’s Haymarket gallery.

James Nguyen, Open Glossary
In collaboration with Tamsen Hopkinson, Budi Sudarto, Kate ten Buuren and Chris Xu
16 September – 19 November 2023

Curator: Shelley McSpedden

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm, Free entry
acca.melbourne
#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri Woiwurrung people as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, along with the neighbouring Boonwurrung, Bunurong, and wider Kulin Nation. We acknowledge their longstanding and continuing care for Country and we recognise First Peoples art and cultural practice has been thriving here for millennia. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

Between Waves

The Yalingwa Exhibition

21 July – 3 September, 2023

A major new exhibition featuring ten ambitious commissions by emerging and established First Nations artists that embrace the intersection of material and immaterial realms of knowledge and knowing. 

Between Waves is the third edition of the Yalingwa exhibition series that supports the development of outstanding contemporary First Peoples art and curatorial practice in Southeast Australia.  Curated by Jessica Clark, the exhibition features new works by Maree Clarke, Dean Cross, Brad Darkson, Matthew Harris, James Howard, Hayley Millar Baker, Jazz Money, Cassie Sullivan, this mob, and Mandy Quadrio.  

Through a range of multidisciplinary frameworks including video, installation, poetry, projection, sculpture and sound, each of the artists respond to concepts expressed by the word ‘Yalingwa’, a Woi Wurrung word which means light, time, vision, or shining a light on the times.  

The exhibition embraces the visible and invisible energy fieldsand flowsthat these ideas set in motion,” Jessica Clark said.  “Each of the artists explore and experiment with the cyclic and sensory rhythms between light and sound, thinking and feeling, time and vision, with relation to the body, materiality, place and space, revealing an interconnected web of shapeshifting ecologies within, beyond and between what can be seen”.

“By engaging processes of remembering, rehabilitation, regeneration and reclamation, the artists’ weave conversations, experiences, and memories to map connections and disconnections with one another, the self, and the world, and highlight the importance of knowledge sharing, holding and deep listening and extends beyond the surface of things”, Jessica said.  


Minister for Creative Industries Steve Dimopoulos said the Andrews Labor Government was proud to support the exhibition as part of its work to develop and promote First Peoples leadership and careers in the creative industries. “By supporting major exhibitions, curatorial positions and Fellowships, the Yalingwa initiative is helping to build the profile of First Peoples art and artists across the state. The free Between Waves exhibition will showcase paintings, poetry, sound art, video art, sculpture and much more. It will be another must-see exhibition that will open up our perspectives on what First Peoples art is and can be.”

ACCA Artistic Director/CEO Max Delany said ACCA was pleased to present the third Yalingwa exhibition at ACCA and to continue to build on the success of previous exhibitions. “Between Waves follows Hannah Presley’s exhibition A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness presented at ACCA in 2018, and Stacie Piper’s WILAM BIIK, presented at TarraWarra in 2021. Both exhibitions had significant impact on a number of levels, and each played a vital role in supporting and elevating the practices of the commissioned artists, and in the creation of important new bodies of work that continue to circulate in galleries and exhibitions nationally – and internationally. We are very excited to continue to present this important series.”

Projects included in Between Waves:

Maree Clarke is a Yorta Yorta, Wamba Wamba, Mutti Mutti and Boonwurrung woman and established multidisciplinary contemporary artist and a pivotal figure in the reclamation of southeast Australian Aboriginal art practices. For Between Waves, Maree will present a new photographic series and projection work that navigates intersections and interconnections between art, culture and science in relation to place. Informed by recent practice-based research in collaboration with The University of Melbourne Histology Platform, this new body of work will explore the internal and external worlds of Phragmites australis (otherwise known as river reeds) – their patterns, structures, and the elemental activity occurring at a cellular level. 

Matthew Harris was born in Wangaratta in 1991 and is of mixed European and Koorie descent. His practice often debases dominant hierarchies through socially critical and conceptual painting and sculpture. Matthew’s commission for Between Waves includes a dramatic suite of seven large-scale ochre paintings that reflect the size and scale of museum archival shelving. Harris formally references notions of minimalism and seriality to draw attention to the relentless and repetitious efforts of museums and collecting institutions to contain First Peoples material culture, and their history of gate-keeping that continues to deny Aboriginal ancestors return to Country.

Jazz Money is a Wiradjuri poet and artist whose creative and cultural practice encompasses installation, performance, film, and text-based works. For Between Waves Jazz will combine the twin strands of their practice, poetry and film, to present an immersive three-channel video work in the form of an evolving poem with infinite possibilities. Drawn from Money’s personal archive of collected and recorded images, this ambitious new commission recalibrates the many ‘lost lines’ or phrases from previous creative writing projects. 

Cassie Sullivan is a palawa woman with a responsive, intimate, and experimental contemporary art practice that crosses disciplines of moving image, photography, writing, sound, installation, and printmaking. For Between Waves, shewill create a new series of large-scale monoprints that reflect the relations of textiles and Country. The works are presented on clouded Perspex reminiscent of the mist that amasses and disperses across Country in lutruwita (Tasmania) and will be generate a maze of ancestral imprinting for the viewer to navigate. 

Brad Darkson is a Narungga man, and contemporary artist working across various media including carving, sound, sculpture, and painting, and multimedia installations that engage and experiment with a range of technologies. Brad’s new commission will recreate a three-dimensional model of a local fish trap using photogrammetry software and interactive animation. Informed by community consultation with the artists’ local Kaurna community members, Brad’s animated multi-projection installation dispels the ongoing hunter-gatherer myth in regards to First Nations art and cultural practice, specifically in relation to sophisticated traditional aquaculture technologies. In doing so, Brad foregrounds the work that continues within community to rehabilitate these important cultural sites.

Hayley Millar Baker is a Gunditjmara and Djabwurrung woman whose contemporary art practice centres painting, photography, collage and film in the development and abstraction of autobiographical narratives and themes relating to her identity and beyond. For Between Waves Hayley will present a major new screen-based video work that channels the in-between internal moments of restrained rage turned to grief rippling through the body and permeating all levels of self. Through size, scale, and silence, Hayley’s new commission simultaneously embraces notions of intimacy and intensity to convey the monumental focus, determination and power of women, their strength and resilience, with the film teetering between moments of action and recognition and the anticipation of reaction or external rupture. 

James Howard is a Jaadwa song-man and composer who will create a long-form, generative sound sculpture that explores the intersecting realms of material and immaterial experience – drawing attention to the way that sound can elicit emotion, despite not having a physical form itself. Derived from a range of field recordings gathered in and around ACCA, James’ asynchronously layered sonic response will draw attention to the often-unnoticed sites or structures of the everyday that are hidden in plain sight. By amplifying the sounds of such spaces, James draws attention to the way that First Nations culture is deeply embedded in our landscape yet overlooked by so many people. 

Mandy Quadrio is a Trawlwoolway and Laremairemener Tasmanian Aboriginal artist working with sculpture and installation. Her contemporary art practice encompasses sculpture, installation, photography, and mixed media, working to unfix racist categorisations, historic denials, and imposed invisibiliy. For Between Waves, Mandy is creating a multi-piece sculptural installation that responds to buried Australian colonial histories that have dominated her Tasmanian Aboriginal people since invasion and colonisation. Asserting her adaptability, strength, and long-time relationships to being, Mandy’s new commission will generate an immersive shadow-world that gently emerges, unfolds, and metamorphoses into the gallery.

Dean Cross was born and raised on Ngunnawal/Ngambri Country and a Worimi man through his paternal bloodline. He is a paratactical artist interested in collisions of materials, ideas and histories. His new commission for Between Waves reflects on life stages, shifts, and changes, and the waves of memory and meaning that influence our encounter with each other and the world. By resurfacing and recontextualizing these things, Cross creates a sculptural self-portrait that prompts contemplation on life, learning, love, and loss, and the ways in which we ascribe memory and meaning to objects, materials, and things. In doing so, Dean’s work asks; are we the sum of all our experiences? Or are we somehow something more?

In addition, Naarm-based Indigenous-arts collective this mob will produce an ambitious new digital commission for ACCA’s new Digital Wing. Taking the form of a digital zine that centres notions of interactivity and connection, this mob will highlight the breadth of their individual and collaborative contemporary art practices by featuring a range of new photography, poetic texts, recorded yarns, mini feature films, interviews, recipes, gardening tips, crossword puzzles. This new digital commission has produced by this mob’s core members:  Yorta Yorta/Wurundjeri and Wiradjuri artist Moorina Bonini, Taungurung curator, artist and writer Kate ten Burren, Lardil and Yangkaal writer and curator Maya Hodge, Luritja artist, curator and writer Jenna Rain Warwick, and Gulumerridjin, Wardaman and KarraJarri Saltwater artist and graphic designer Jenna Lee, and will be accessible within the exhibition space, and through ACCA’s new Digital Wing. 

About Jessica Clark

Jessica Clark is a proud palawa/pallawah woman and an independent curator living and working on Wurundjeri Country in Naarm. Currently Yalingwa Curator at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Jessica has been working in various independent and collaborative curatorial roles since 2017 and is a current PhD candidate at the Victorian College of the Arts, The University of Melbourne. Recently, Jessica worked as part of the curatorial team for the national touring exhibition Experimenta Life Forms: International Triennial of Media Art (2021–2023), and in 2019-2020 worked with Country Arts SA, within a First Nations-led creative team, to develop and curate the exhibition VIETNAM: ONE IN, ALL IN, in response to the cultural and political sensitives inherent in the honoring and acknowledgement of the service and lived experience of South Australian Aboriginal Vietnam Veterans.  

Jessica is an alumni of: International Curators ProgramAsia Pacific Triennial x TarraWarra Biennial (2021–2023), PIAD First Nations Colloquium, South Africa (2019), Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair Cultural Keepers Program (2017–2021), Wesfarmers Indigenous Arts Leadership Program at the National Gallery of Australia (2018), and the First Nations Curators Program at the Venice Biennale (2017). Previous independent curatorial projects include breathing space (2021) at Margaret Lawrence Gallery, In and of this place (2021) at Benalla Art Gallery [online], All of us (2018) at Blindside Gallery, and TELL: Contemporary Indigenous Photography (2017–2018) for the Ballarat International Foto Biennale.

About Yalingwa

Yalingwa is a Victorian Government Visual Arts Initiative developed in partnership between ACCA, Creative Victoria, and TarraWarra Museum of Art. The program is overseen by the Yalingwa Directions Circle, chaired by Aunty Joy Wandin AO, and includes First Peoples Elders and cultural, curatorial, and community leaders.

Announced in 2017, the initiative comprises new curatorial positions, major exhibitions alternating between ACCA and TarraWarra, and one year Artist Fellowships of $60,000 for senior South East Australian First Nations artists. The first exhibition in the series was A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness curated by Hannah Presley at ACCA in 2018 and was followed by
by WILAM BIIK 2021 at TarraWarra Museum of Art, curated by Stacie Piper. 


Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm, Free entry
acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri Woiwurrung people as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, along with the neighbouring Boonwurrung, Bunurong, and wider Kulin Nations. We acknowledge their longstanding and continuing care for Country and we recognise First Peoples art and cultural practice has been thriving here for millennia. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

Mithu Sen: mOTHERTONGUE

22 April – 18 June 2023

Continuing the annual ACCA International series of solo exhibitions by influential artists on the international stage, a new exhibition of work by leading New Delhi-based artist Mithu Sen will open on 22 April.

Mithu Sen (b. 1971) was born in West Bengal, and is one of India’s most renowned contemporary artists, with a prolific body of work recognised through awards, exhibitions, and performances at prestigious forums across the globe.

Mithu Sen explores myths of identity, and their intersection with the structures of our world, whether social, political, economic, or emotional. Sen works fundamentally as a performer, tangling with politics of language, disciplining of bodies, conventions of society, and polite impositions of the art world. Known for her provocative, alluring, and playful examination of these hierarchies, Sen is committed to perpetual unbecoming through performative interventions.

mOTHERTONGUE surveys the past fifteen years of Mithu Sen’s compelling art practice, alongside a series of major new commissions. Curated by ACCA Artistic Director/CEO Max Delany, the exhibition is presented as a mind-map, moving between interior states and visible surfaces, charting Sen’s language-based articulations and interventions. mOTHERTONGUE will explore the ways in which language is channelled into forms as diverse as drawing, media and performance to create complex artworks which resist definitional categories and elude institutional power structures related to race, gender, ethnicity, caste, and location.

Returning time and again to the idea of myth and initiating its unmaking, Mithu Sen’s work explores personal and public dependencies through radical hospitality by generating concurrent dialogues, gatherings, and contracts that test relationships between guests and hosts, participants and performers, and ultimately, an artist and her audiences —  thereby complicating the notions of identity circulating around her as a woman artist located in the global south, navigating feminist and post-colonial discourses, framed within the art market.

Max Delany said ACCA was excited to present the work of such a distinguished and intriguing artist. “Mithu Sen’s practice occupies both intellectual and emotional registers – at once sensual, intimate and bodily, whilst equally conceptual, critical and subversive, extending from conceptual art to glitch poetry and performative media interventions, and from daring, libidinous drawings to graphic works which condemn the prevalence of communal violence and marginalisation in Indian and wider global society”. 

Mithu Sen lives and works in New Delhi. She grew up in a Bengali family steeped in culture; her mother is a poet, and Mithu originally considered poetry her calling. Writing Bangla poetry from an early age, she published several books, before expanding her repertoire to the visual arts. Sen studied at Visva-Bharati University in Santiniketan, where she gained her BFA and MFA in Painting from 1990 to 1997. She subsequently participated in the post-graduate program at the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland in 2001. Mithu credits her move to Delhi at the end of 1997 as a defining moment in her artistic journey, where she was a migrant in the nation’s capital, home to diverse cultures, populations, and a cosmopolitan and anglophone art world.

Mithu is now one of India’s most renowned contemporary artists. She was awarded the Skoda Prize in 2010 and the Prudential Eye Award for Contemporary Asian Art – Drawing in 2015. She has exhibited and performed in major international forums including Sharjah Biennale 15, UAE (2023); sonsbeek 20-24, Arnhem, the Netherlands (2021); APT9-9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2018); Kunstmuseum, Wolfsburg (2018); Chemould Prescott Road, Mumbai (2018); Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi (2017); Guggenheim Museum, New York (2016); Unlimited: Art Basel (2016); Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan, USA (2014); Kochi-Muziris Biennale (2014); Galerie Krinzinger, Vienna (2014); Dhaka Art Summit (2014); Tate Modern Project Space, London (2013); Zacheta Museum, Warsaw (2011); and National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (2008), among other forums and institutions.


Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm, Free entry
acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

2023 Artistic Program

This year ACCA celebrates a 21st and a 40th: 21 years in our iconic building designed by Wood Marsh, and 40 years as a platform for artists to make new, risk-taking and experimental work that resonates and connects, challenges our thinking, and encourages new perspectives.

ACCA’s 2023 program includes the following keynote exhibitions, as well as a series of events and programs to mark this milestone year and our rich history as a platform for artists and a centre for the exchange of ideas.

 

Data Relations
Until March 19
Artists: Zach Blas, Tega Brain & Sam Lavigne, Lauren Lee McCarthy, Machine Listening, Mimi Onuoha, Winne Soon, and the Digital Relations Summer School
Curator: Miriam Kelly
Coordinating Curator: Shelley McSpedden

Data Relations brings together artist-led projects that lyrically wrestle with some of the key issues and challenges of our contemporary data-driven society. The exhibition includes major new commissions and site-specific installations by Australian and international artists and collectives who critically and speculatively engage with the ways in which the data economy and related technological developments manifest in inter-personal and wider social relationships.

 

Lucy Guerin: NEWRETRO
March 25–April 2
Curator: Elyse Goldfinch
Artistic Director: Lucy Guerin

Part of Frame: A biennial of dance, this major new durational performance by leading contemporary choreographer Lucy Guerin reconstructs twenty-one existing dance works from the past twenty-one years, and relearnt by an ensemble of twenty-one dancers.

NEWRETRO takes the form of a site-responsive choreographic work and installation occupying ACCA’s galleries. The work’s score is both retrospective and speculative, condensing choreography from different time periods into the same temporal space, creating a living archive of new, corporeal gestures.

 

Mithu Sen: mOTHERTONGUE
April 22–June 18, 2023
Curator: Max Delany

Continuing the ACCA International series of solo exhibitions by influential artists on the international stage, ACCA presents a major solo exhibition featuring new commissions and existing work by New Delhi-based artist Mithu Sen.

Constructed as a cartographic installation that charts the paradoxical and contradictory impulses and trajectories in Mithu Sen’s work, mOTHERTONGUE explores the ways in which language, drawing, media and performance are employed by the artist to create complex artworks which resist definitional categories and elide institutional power structures related to patriarchy, nationalism, caste and class, race and gender, and geo-political location.

 

Between Waves: 2023 Yalingwa Exhibition
July 1–September 3
Artists: Maree Clarke, Dean Cross, Brad Darkson, Matthew Harris, James Howard, Hayley Millar Baker, Jazz Money, Cassie Sullivan, this mob, and Mandy Quadrio
Curator: Jessica Clark

Between Waves is the the third edition of the Yalingwa exhibition series that supports the development of outstanding contemporary First Peoples art and curatorial practice in Southeast Australia.

Between Waves explores and experiments with the visible and invisible energy fields and flows of material memory to illuminate an interconnected web of shapeshifting ecologies within, beyond, and between what can be seen. The exhibition presents ten ambitious new commissions by emerging and established artists working at the intersection of material and immaterial realms of knowledge and knowing.

 

James Nguyen: Open Glossary
September 16–November 19, 2023
In collaboration with Tamsen Hopkinson, Budi Sudarto, Kate ten Buuren and Chris Xu
2023 Copyright Agency Partnership Commission
Curator: Shelley McSpedden

The second edition of the Copyright Agency Partnerships Commission, supporting mid-career and established visual artists to produce a major new commission, in Open Glossary James Nguyen collaborates with Tamsen Hopkinson, Budi Sudarto, Kate ten Buuren and Chris Xu on a new multi-lingual installation.

Born in Vietnam and based in Narrm/Melbourne, Nguyen’s interdisciplinary, collaborative practice examines strategies of decolonisation, while interrogating the politics of family history, language, displacement and diaspora. Open Glossary interrogates the language and terminologies that permeate contemporary art and society more widely. It includes a series of multilingual glossaries and language toolkits to bring non-English and plain-English speaking communities into artworld discourse through socially-engaged installations, videos, performances and events.

 

From the other side
December 9, 2023–March 31, 2024
Curators: Elyse Goldfinch and Jessica Clark

A group exhibition that brings together Australian and international artists to unsettle the tropes of the horror genre and its relationship to vulnerability, anxiety, rage, and revenge. The exhibition centres the monstrous-feminine, her desire for consumption and dual role as temptress and castrator.

From the other side draws upon horror’s shared cultural imaginary and its ability to transgress and destabilise institutions of power, conjuring counternarratives and alternative mythologies that challenge the assumed boundaries of the body, gender, the self and the ‘other’.

 

ACCA’s Digital Wing is now live
A flexible, iterative constellation of digital initiatives, ACCA’s Digital Wing features artistic commissions, creative development, knowledge-sharing and publishing.

Maree Clarke awarded $60,000 Yalingwa Fellowship

Mutti Mutti, Wamba Wamba, Yorta Yorta and Boonwurrung woman Maree Clarke has been awarded the prestigious Yalingwa Fellowship, a $60,000 award for a Senior First Nations artist currently living and working in Victoria who has made an outstanding contribution to creative practice in the First Peoples arts community and are at a critical moment in their career.

Announced today by Minister for Creative Industries Steve Dimopoulos, the Fellowship is part of the Yalingwa program, a collaboration between Creative Victoria, ACCA and TarraWarra Museum of Art designed to support the development of outstanding contemporary Indigenous art and curatorial practice.

Following an open call for submissions, Maree was awarded the Fellowship by the Yalingwa Directions Circle, a panel that includes members of the Indigenous arts and wider community, as well as representatives from Creative Victoria, ACCA and TarraWarra Museum of Art.

In making their decision, the Directions Circle noted Maree’s exemplary contribution to arts, culture and Indigenous curatorial practice in the South East particularly, as well as her reclamation and innovation of cultural practice, and the role she has played as a teacher, curator and mentor.

“Our unanimous decision to award Maree this Fellowship recognizes not only her stellar career as a groundbreaking artist working nationally and internationally, but also the inspirational role she has played in her 35-year career for emerging artists and curators, and her sustained impact on community through mentoring and collaboration,” the panel noted.

Minister for Creative Industries Steve Dimopoulos said: “The Yalingwa initiative is one of the ways we are working to develop and promote First Peoples leadership in the creative industries, and back the careers of First Peoples artists and arts workers.

“Maree Clarke is one of our most respected and important artists and a well-deserved recipient of this Fellowship. I hope this opportunity enables her to reach even greater heights and introduces her work to a wider audience.”

Maree is the third recipient of the Yalingwa Fellowship. The inaugural prize went to Melbourne-based artist Destiny Deacon from the Kuku, East Cape region and Torres Strait, and the second to Kokatha and Nukunu woman Yhonnie Scarce.

Maree Clarke said: “I am honoured to accept this award, and to have my name included alongside respected former Fellowship recipients Yhonnie Scarce and Destiny Deacon. This is an incredible gift, which will allow me to focus on long term projects and conduct further research in the UK that will inform my new body of work. I would like to thank the Minister Dimopoulos, Creative Victoria, ACCA and TarraWarra for creating this visionary program. I am passionate about arts and culture in the Southeast, and I want to recognise how important the investment of the Yalingwa arts initiative is in nurturing, promoting and making visible arts and culture here in Victoria.”

Based in Naarm/Melbourne, Maree grew up in Northwest Victoria, and is a pivotal figure in the reclamation of southeast Australian First People’s art practices, revitalising the creation of traditional possum skin cloaks, kangaroo teeth and river reed necklaces.  In 2021 she was the subject of a major survey exhibition Maree Clarke – Ancestral Memories  at the National Gallery of Victoria and other recent exhibitions include Tarnanthi, Art Gallery of South Australia (2021), and the National at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2021).

Established in 2017, Yalingwa is a multi-year program which, in addition to the Fellowships, also includes curatorial positions for First People’s curators to work with host organisations in the development of a major exhibition.

The current Yalingwa Curator, Palawa woman Jessica Clark, will deliver the third Yaligwa exhibition at ACCA in July. Titled Between Waves, the exhibition will also include a new work by Maree Clarke, and new commissions by artists Dean Cross, Brad Darkson, Matthew Harris, James Howard, Hayley Millar Baker, Jazz Money, Cassie Sullivan and Mandy Quadrio that explore and experiment with the visible and invisible energy fields and flows of light, time, and vision.

ACCA launches new Digital Wing

A new commission by New York based artists Tega Brain and Sam Lavigne and the Data Relations digital publication will launch ACCA’s new Digital Wing on 30 January 2023.

ACCA’s current exhibition Data Relations explores our rapidly expanding data economy, surveillance technologies and the ascendance of Artificial Intelligence. Tega Brain and Sam Lavigne’s project, titled Offset, is a new online platform that suggests a variety of social exchanges and political actions individuals can undertake to reduce emissions and earn carbon credits. The project also invites suggestions from visitors for the artists to explore and bring to life over the course of the year.

According to Brain and Lavigne, the existing carbon offset markets act to maintain a status quo rather than address root causes of the climate catastrophe. “For ACCA’s digital commission, we will launch the first stage of Offset: Version 0.1 of an alternative carbon offset market. In this market, historic direct political actions will be quantified and sold as carbon offsets. How might political work that slows or prevents combustion be recognised in carbon markets just like other biophysical efforts to reduce emissions?,” they ask. 

Offset is the first work to be included in ACCA’s new Digital Wing, a flexible, iterative constellation of digital initiatives which is part of ACCA’s ongoing strategy to create works beyond the gallery walls.  The Digital Wing will include artistic commissions, creative development, knowledge-sharing and publishing.

ACCA Artistic Director/CEO Max Delany said the Digital Wing is a future-focused online destination for new and experimental contemporary art practices. “We are extremely grateful to the Ian Potter Foundation for supporting our new Digital Wing, which expands ACCA’s reach beyond the gallery.  ACCA’s artistic program will be expanded through digital commissions and projects that will be launched through the Digital Wing, so in time, it will be populated by new art, as well as writing, publications and research and a site for experimentation, collaboration, new partnerships and communities,” Max said.

____________________________________________________________________________

The launch of the Digital Wing will also include the release of the Data Relations digital publication, which features texts by leading writers and academics in the field, addressing the art and ideas of artists included in the Data Relations exhibition.

Guest Curator Miriam Kelly’s curatorial essay considers the research and methodology undertaken in the development of Data Relations. Atlanta-based writer Amy Hale takes readers through the shady Californian Ideology of Silicon Valley as explored in Zach Blas’ Metric mysticism. London-based PHD researcher Yung Au tackles data’s relationship to the censorship, erasure and suppression of public information in Winnie Soon’s Unerasable characters series 2020-2022. California-based academic Mashinka Firunts Hakopian explores themes of intimacy, control and autonomy in Lauren Lee McCarthy’s new installation and video work Surrogate 2022.

Exhibiting artists Machine Listening (Sean Dockray, James Parker and Joel Stern) present the full transcript of their multi-channel sound installation, After words 2022, featured in the exhibition; and Mimi Ọnụọha has collaborated on an experimental performance script with New York-based Postdoctoral Fellow Tiara Roxanne. Installation images of the exhibition and moving-image excerpts from works are accompanied by ekphrastic alt texts written by Loqui Paatsch.

The Data Relations digital publication is generously supported by the Ian Potter Foundation, edited by Elyse Goldfinch, ACCA’s Curator, Public Programs and Publications, and designed by Lloyd Mst with website development by Jake Bonin. It is available via the ACCA website from 30 January.  Expressions of Interest are currently invited for participation in the Data Relations Summer School.  Staged over four days from 18 February, this is a free public program of experimental talks, workshops, performances, investigations and site-visits focused on understanding and intervening in the social consequences of a data driven society. Data Relations Summer School is curated by ACCA in collaboration with RMIT Research Fellow Joel Stern. Further information and EOI is available here.

Data Relations: until 19 March 2023, ACCA Galleries and Digital Wing

Currently showing at ACCA, Data Relations brings together artist-led projects that lyrically wrestle with some of the key issues and challenges of our contemporary data-driven society. The exhibition includes major new commissions and site-specific installations by Australian and international artists and collectives who critically and speculatively engage with the ways in which the data economy and related technological developments manifest in inter-personal and wider social relationships.

Artists: Zach Blas, Tega Brain & Sam Lavigne, Lauren Lee McCarthy, Machine Listening (Sean Dockray, James Parker and Joel Stern), Mimi Onuoha, Winnie Soon; plus Data Relations Summer School 
Guest Curator Miriam Kelly, Coordinating Curator Shelley McSpedden.

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared foACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, along with the neighbouring Boonwurrung and Bunurong people, and wider Kulin Nations. We acknowledge their longstanding and continuing care for Country and culture, and we extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

Data Relations

Featuring artists: Zach Blas, Tega Brain & Sam Lavigne, Lauren Lee McCarthy, Machine Listening (Sean Dockray, James Parker and Joel Stern), Mimi Onuoha, Winnie Soon; plus Data Relations Summer School
Guest Curator Miriam Kelly, Coordinating Curator Shelley McSpedden

Opening on 10 December, this major new exhibition and program explores our rapidly expanding data economy, data-obsessed society, and the extremes of artificial intelligence.

Data Relations features major new commissions and site-specific installations from six Australian and international artists and collectives across ACCA’s four galleries.

In addition, a new online project by New York/Sydney based artists Tega Brain and Sam Lavigne will launch ACCA’s new Digital Wing, a new platform and constellation of digital initiatives including artistic commissions, creative development, knowledge-sharing and publishing. 

The exhibition will also be accompanied by ACCA’s a dedicated digital publication and a week-long Data Relations Summer School featuring performances, talks and workshops by participating artists who will be joined by a wider cohort of artists, academics, curators and activists, encouraging a wider appreciation of what data means and how it can be explored within contemporary art practice. 

Exhibition curator Miriam Kelly says: “Artists included in Data Relations reflect on the effects of the contemporary data economy and techno-mediated relationships in ways that are profound, humorous, poetic and confronting. The impacts of what has been described as the ‘data revolution’ – that began with the internet and accelerated with the opportunities to commercialise data and store vast amounts of ‘big data’ – cannot be understated within our economic, political, environmental, social and cultural contexts. Data now permeates contemporary life”.

“The title, Data Relations, is drawn from analyses of the data economy as having generated new forms of social interaction, while perpetuating existing discrimination, bias, forms of social oppression and class division. I believe that some of the most interesting and vital art of our times is being made with and about data, and particularly the issue of data relations,” she said.

Data Relations includes:

  • Two works by LA-based artist Lauren Lee McCarthy, LAUREN 2017- and SURROGATE 2022, are brought together into a newly commissioned installation and performance that reflects on the physical intimacy of data, surveillance and AI as it relates to the home, body and kin.
  • Hong Kong born, artist-researcher Winnie Soon’s Unerasable characters I-III 2020-22 – a series based on a data-set of censored social media posts, which examines the wider and seemingly endless consequences of control that is implemented through politics, technological platforms and social infrastructure.
  • A new multi-channel sound installation, After Words 2022that explores the datafication and computation of language and speech across a series of semi-fictional tales and speculative scenes, by Machine Listening (Sean Dockray, James Parker and Joel Stern).
  • An installation by New York artist Mimi Onuoha centred around her short film These networks in our skin 2021, depicting four women who work to rewire the cables that carry the data that powers the world, and what it might mean to recreate the internet. Onuoha has collaborated with Dinzi Amobi, a local fashion designer and founder of Ulo Australia, a contemporary African lifestyle brand, on a site-specific iteration of the installation for ACCA.
  • Metric mysticism 2018/22 by Zach Blas, a multi-channel installation and lecture-performance that gazes into the crystal balls of Silicon Valley to chart the transmutation of big data into a magical substance that predicts – and polices – the future.
  • Tega Brain and Sam Lavigne’s Synthetic messenger 2021 is a multi-channel video tracing the zoom performance of a botnet as it attempts to artificially inflate the value of climate change news and reporting by clicking on ads. The project examines the relationship between climate change and the internet’s data-hungry business model, that subsequently produces its capacity for splintering public opinion and an algorithmic myopia.

In addition, a major new commission by Tega Brain and Sam Lavigne, Offset, will launch ACCA’s Digital Wing in January 2023. Offset will see the artists establish an alternative carbon offset market platform focusing on social exchanges and political actions with the aim of contributing to a program of radical change. The project will playfully propose a variety of actions that individuals can undertake to reduce emissions and earn carbon credits, as well as produce an archive of offsets purchased from leading offset organisations.

Data Relations: 10 December 2022 to 19 March 2023, ACCA Galleries and Digital Wing. 

Artists: Zach Blas, Tega Brain & Sam Lavigne, Lauren Lee McCarthy, Machine Listening (Sean Dockray, James Parker and Joel Stern), Mimi Onuoha, Winnie Soon; plus Data Relations Summer School
Guest Curator Miriam Kelly, Coordinating Curator Shelley McSpedden

About Data Relations Summer School: 

Staged over one week in February 2023, Data Relations Summer School is a co-presented program of experimental talks, workshops, performances, investigations and site-visits focused on understanding and intervening in the social consequences of a data driven society. As an exhibition of contemporary art that critically engages with political concerns about data, as well as presenting works that visualise real-world data-sets, Data Relations Summer School builds literacy in a rich recent history of data in art and cultural practice.

About ACCA’s Digital Wing:  

A flexible, iterative constellation of digital initiatives, ACCA’s new Digital Wing will include artistic commissions, creative development, knowledge-sharing and publishing, and is aligned with ACCA’s ongoing strategy of creating works beyond the gallery walls. Supported by the Ian Potter Foundation, ACCA’s Digital Wing fosters innovation in art form beyond the gallery, supporting new communities of practice, and a future-focused network of contemporary art practices through sites of experimentation and development, partnership and collaboration. Further details to come.

Read more about the exhibition here.

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

Paul Yore: WORD MADE FLESH

Paul Yore: WORD MADE FLESH is an extensive survey exhibition encompassing the full scope of the artist’s work, and includes a major new room-scaled installation developed especially for the exhibition.

Continuing ACCA’s Australian solo series which highlights the work of significant and influential contemporary Australian artists, WORD MADE FLESH is constructed maximally as a gesamtkunstwerk, presenting work from the past fifteen years, including appliquéd quilts and needlework, banners and pendants, collage and assemblage, and large-scale mixed media installations.

Paul Yore is one of Australia’s most thought-provoking and consequential multidisciplinary artists. Born in Naarm/Melbourne in 1987, he lives and works on Gunaikurnai Country in Gippsland, Victoria, and completed his studies in painting, archaeology and anthropology at Monash University in 2010. Yore’s work engages with the histories of religious art and ritual, queer identity, pop-culture and neo-liberal capitalism, recasting a vast array of found images, materials and texts into sexually and politically loaded tableaux and assemblages which celebrate hybrid and fluid identities, unstable and contradictory meanings, and the glowing horizon of queer worldmaking.

Paul Yore: WORD MADE FLESH is structured around five purpose-designed spaces presenting specific bodies of work and discursive contexts: Signs; Embodiment; Manifesto; The Horizon; and Word Made Flesh. This itinerary articulates two key trajectories in the artist’s work: the first charting the development of Yore’s textile practice, beginning with small, embroidered works through to large-scale appliquéd quilts, which variously draw on the traditions of classical Greek art, decorative Flemish and French tapestries, trashy pop-culture, gay porn, cartoons, psychedelia, narrative and history painting, as well as the decorative semantic excesses of rococo style.

The second trajectory is represented in a new kaleidoscopic, architecturally-scaled installation, anarchically composed of improvised makeshift structures, mixed media sculpture and found objects, collage and assemblage, painting, video, sound and light. This immersive installation imagines a queer alternative reality, erected from the wasteland of the Anthropocene, performatively implicating itself into the debased spectacle of hyper-capitalist society.

Yore has exhibited widely since the early 2000s, with notable individual exhibitions including SEEING IS BELIEVING BUT FEELING IS THE TRUTH, Rising, Golden Square, Melbourne, 2022; Let Them Eat Cake, Neon Parc, Melbourne, 2021; Pleasures Against Nature, RMIT Project Space and Spare Room, Melbourne, 2020; Let the World Burn, Textile Art Museum Australia, Ararat, 2019; It’s All Wrong but It’s Alright, Dark Mofo, Black Temple Gallery, Hobart, 2019; Paul Yore, NADA, Miami Beach, Florida, 2016; Boys Gone Wild, Studio 12, Gertrude Contemporary, Melbourne, 2012; The Big Rainbow Funhouse of Cosmic Brutality Part 2, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 2009.

Recent group exhibitions include Queer: Stories from the NGV Collection, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2022; SOFT_WARE: Textiles after Technology, Kunsthaus Erfurt, Germany, 2020; Exhibition Colectiva, Galeria Casa Colon, Yucatan, Mexico, 2020; Misfit: Collage and Queer Practice, National Art School, Sydney, 2020; 16th International Triennal of Tapestry: Breaching Borders, Centralne Muzeum Włókiennictwa, Łódź, Poland, 2019; London Summer Intensive, Camden Arts Centre, London, UK, 2019; RIJSWIJK TEXTILE BIENNIAL, Rijswijk Museum, Rijswijk, Netherlands, 2019; National Anthem, Buxton Contemporary, Melbourne, 2019; and Craftivism. Dissident Objects and Subversive Forms, Shepparton Art Museum, 2019.

Yore has been a recipient of numerous awards and residencies including an Australia Council Arts Project Grant, 2022; Marten Bequest Travelling Scholarship, 2015–16; Artspace Studio Residency, Sydney, 2014; Geumcheon Residency, Seoul, 2013; Gertrude Contemporary Studio Residency, 2012­–11; and the Alliance Française Prize, 2009.

To accompany the exhibition, a major monographic publication is forthcoming, published in partnership with Art Ink, which includes an extensive interview with the artist and essays and texts by leading Australian and international artists, scholars and commentators.

Paul Yore: WORD MADE FLESH

Curator: Max Delany, in collaboration with Paul Yore and Devon Ackermann

Read more via here.

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne #accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

Announcing James Nguyen is the second recipient of the $80,000 Copyright Agency Partnerships Commission, in collaboration with ACCA
James Nguyen. Photograph: Damian Gibney

The Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) and the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund are pleased to announce Melbourne artist James Nguyen is the second recipient of the CAP (Copyright Agency Partnerships) Commission.

The commission is part of a three-year series run by the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund with leading Australian arts institutions 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (Sydney), Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (Melbourne) and the Institute of Modern Art (Brisbane) to support mid-career and established visual artists with an $80,000 artistic commission and solo exhibition opportunity. 50 artists applied for this year’s commission, which was assessed by a panel of representatives from the partner institutions and the Copyright Agency.

Born in Vietnam and based in Narrm/Melbourne, James Nguyen’s interdisciplinary practice moves between live and online performance, video, drawing and installation. He is interested in personal history and migrant absurdities, often working with his family and friends to examine the politics of art, self-representation, displacement and diaspora. 

For this project, which will encompass a major exhibition across all four ACCA galleries opening in September 2023, Nguyen plans to create Open Glossary, a multi-lingual installation that opens up the language and terminologies that permeate contemporary art and society more widely. Nguyen will collaborate with academics, community members and social enterprises to create a series of multilingual glossaries and language toolkits to bring non-English and plain-English speaking communities into artworld conversations. 

‘The artworld has the privilege of literacy and access to text’, Nguyen says. ‘It is where artists and our communities push for social change, contesting important ideas and concepts. But what of the many communities that do not necessarily speak, or feel they can engage with the complex terminologies of contemporary art?’

Max Delany, ACCA Artistic Director & CEO said: ‘James Nguyen left a career as a pharmacist to study art full time, and is today one of Australia’s most compelling artists – injecting a sense of humour and play into his work whilst interrogating issues around histories of colonisation, migration and cultural identity. We are especially pleased to be working with James towards the realisation of this ambitious project and exhibition, which will continue ACCA’s annual Contemporary Australian Solo exhibition series.’

‘We are extremely grateful to the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund for this collaboration, and for their visionary support of contemporary Australian artists to make substantial new, ground-breaking works’, Max said.

Copyright Agency CEO Josephine Johnston says ‘This is such a timely and important commission for James, and we are delighted that our partnership with ACCA through CAP provides the financial support for James to work uninhibited, as well as receiving the unique expertise from ACCA to deliver an outstanding exhibition.’

‘What a total privilege to work with ACCA, Copyright Agency and their audiences,’ James says.  ‘Leading up to this project, I did a PhD on language brokering and translation at the UNSW Art & Design under the guidance of Professor Jennifer Biddle and Dr Veronica Tello. My practice has been shaped by the many conversations and endless patience of all my teachers, parents, aunties, uncles, lovers, friends and strangers.’

James Nguyen has been the recipient of several prizes and awards, including the Clitheroe Foundation Scholarship, the Nillumbik Art Prize for Contemporary Art, and the Anne & Gordon Samstag International Visual Arts Scholarship. His work has been included in group exhibitions across Australia, including The National in 2019. Recent solo exhibitions include Re:Tuning, (with Victoria Pham and collaborators, forthcoming at the Sydney Opera House), 2022, Re.Sounding, (with Victoria Pham and collaborators), Samstag Museum, Adelaide, 2021, Homesickness, (with Nguyen Thi Kim Nhung) a commission by the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 2018; and BuffaloDeer, (with Nguyen Ngoc Cu) Westspace, Melbourne 2016.

In 2021 Texta Queen was announced as the first recipient of the Copyright Agency Partnerships commission and their work will be exhibited by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in late 2022. The third Copyright Agency Partnership will be offered in 2023 with the Institute of Modern Art in Brisbane.

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

ACCA announces Jessica Clark as third Yalingwa Curator and welcomes Jessica to the ACCA team
Jessica Clark. Photograph: Keelan O’Hehir

Go to Yalingwa Program Page »

This week the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) welcomed Jessica Clark to the role of Yalingwa Curator. An independent curator and PhD candidate at the Victorian College of the Arts, Jessica will be responsible for conceiving and realising the 2023 Yalingwa exhibition at ACCA, which is the third in a series of First Nations exhibitions arranged as part of the Yalingwa visual arts initiative. 

ACCA Artistic Director/CEO Max Delany said Jessica’s achievements as an emerging curator and academic, and her interests in art history, education and exploring inter-cultural relationships between people, place and materials will bring a rich perspective to the role.   

“Conversation is central to Jessica’s curatorial practice, who has worked extensively engaging First People’s artistic, cultural practices and community practices. Jessica is an active participant in local and international cultural and curatorial exchange programs, with a curatorial methodology focused on consultation, care and respect”.

“We are excited to have Jessica join the curatorial team at ACCA and to build on the highly acclaimed Yalingwa exhibition series, which includes A Lightness of Spirit is the Measure of Happiness, curated by Hannah Presley at ACCA in 2018, and Stacie Piper’s 2021 TarraWarra exhibition, Wilam Biik,” Max said. 

Jessica is a proud Tasmanian Aboriginal woman. She was born in nipaluna, lutruwita (Hobart, Tasmania) and currently lives and works on Wurundjeri Country in Naarm (Melbourne). Her independent practice is focused on fostering critical curatorial engagement with the presentation of Aboriginal art, with an interest in challenging preconceived ideas/ideals about what Aboriginal art is and can be.

Jessica Clark has said of her appointment: “It’s a great privilege to take up the role of Yalingwa Curator at ACCA. I feel honoured to have this opportunity to work in dialogue with the ground-breaking exhibitions that have been previously curated by Hannah Presley and Stacie Piper in this role. I am excited at the opportunity to develop this third iteration of the Yalingwa visual arts initiative and to join the fabulous ACCA team and be guided by their expertise. This will be my first ongoing curatorial appointment in an institution-based context, and I am excited at the new opportunities and platform the exhibition will offer contemporary Aboriginal artists. I look forward to meeting with the Yalingwa Directions Circle, to start the conversations, and connect with artists; their current ideas, interests and contemporary art practices.” 

As an independent curator Jessica Clark has developed an impressive series of exhibitions and projects including TELL: Contemporary Indigenous Photography (2017–218) for the Ballarat International Foto Biennale, the first exhibition in the biennale’s history dedicated to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art. As curator for the exhibition VIETNAM: ONE IN, ALL IN (2019–2020), Jessica worked with an entirely First Nations led creative team to develop an interview-based exhibition model in response to the cultural and political sensitives inherent in the honouring and acknowledgement of the service and lived experience of South Australian Aboriginal Vietnam Veterans.  

 Recent exhibition projects include breathing space (2021) and one (&) another (2020) at Margaret Lawrence Gallery, In and of this place (2021) at Benalla Art Gallery [online], and as part of the team for the national touring exhibition Experimenta Life Forms: International Triennial of Media Art (2021–2023). Jessica is a current participant in the International Curators ProgramAsia Pacific Triennial x TarraWarra Biennial (2021–2023), and alumni of: PIAD First Nations Colloquium, South Africa (2019), Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair Cultural Keepers Program (2017–2021), Wesfarmers Indigenous Arts Leadership Program at the National Gallery of Australia (2018), Signature Works: Innovation Lab (2018), and the First Nations Curators Program at the Venice Biennale (2017). 

About the Yalingwa Initiative 

Yalingwa is a visual arts initiative of the Victorian Government, developed in partnership with ACCA and Tarrawarra Museum of Art, that aims to support the development of outstanding contemporary First Peoples’ art and curatorial practice, with a primary focus on southeast Australian Aboriginal artists within a national context. 

The Yalingwa project has been designed to provide a platform for First Peoples artists and curators to develop their work at a senior professional level within a leading and high-profile public gallery and museum context, as well as offering a series of First Peoples Artist Fellowships.

The Yalingwa series encompasses three discrete but related program elements as follows:

  • Curatorial positions for First Peoples curators
  • A major exhibition focussing on commissions by contemporary First Peoples artists
  • Artist Fellowships of $60,000 for senior South East Australian First Nations artists who have made an important contribution to the development of Indigenous cultural expression.

The Yalingwa Initiative was inaugurated at ACCA in 2017–2019, with the second cycle following at TarraWarra from 2020–2021. This third edition of the series will be held at ACCA over 2022–2024, with the Yalingwa Curator to be appointed in late 2021, who will be lead the research and development of the exhibition scheduled at ACCA in 2023, among other roles. The program is overseen by the Yalingwa Directions Circle, chaired by Aunty Joy Murphy Wandin AO, that includes First Nations Elders and cultural, curatorial and community leaders.

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne

#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

Frances Barrett: Meatus

Frances Barrett’s much-anticipated exhibition Meatus, part of the celebrated series Suspended Moment: The Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship, will open at ACCA on 2 April 2022, having been postponed since 2020 due to prolonged pandemic-related lockdowns.

Suspended Moment: The Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship is a suite of unique commissions, originally announced in 2018, to support Australian women artists working at the nexus of performance and installation. Drawing on her background in performance, curating and collaborative models of making, Frances Barrett has expanded the solo commissioning focus of the Fellowship to present new sonic compositions and live performances by multiple artists. Alongside a major sound installation by Barrett, developed in collaboration with Hayley Forward and Brian Fuata, Barrett has curated specially commissioned sound compositions by artists Nina Buchanan, Del Lumanta and Sione Teumohenga, as well as a series of incursions by Debris Facility Ltd, responding to the concept of Meatus.

A ‘meatus’ is an opening or passage leading to the interior of the body. Encompassing a range of sensations and functions, the plurality of meatus becomes a way for Barrett to explore a practice of listening that decentres the ear to activate the entire body, attuned to both conscious responses and unconscious intensities.

Barrett has conceived of ACCA’s four galleries as an immersive environment of sound and light – a performative staging of the body, which bleeds and leaks, and into which the audience may enter to consider the physical, sensual and critical experience of listening. Meatus foregrounds the affective and relational dynamics of sound and listening to address the attendant and expanded possibilities of the body.

Commissioning Curator Annika Kristensen has said “Meatus is a radical reimagining of the art gallery – transforming a space which traditionally presents visual experiences into a theatrical and enveloping environment in which sound becomes the primary object. It’s been a pleasure to work with Frances in her dual role as artist and curator to finally realise this ambitious project, now presented at a time when visitors can once again enjoy the embodied intensities of being within a physical gallery space.”

Suspended Moment: The Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship, named after the Italian-born Australian artist Katthy Cavaliere (19722012), is presented in partnership between the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), Melbourne; Carriageworks, Sydney; and the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), Hobart.

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council its arts funding and advisory body.

Frances Barrett: Meatus
2 April–19 June 2022
A project led by Frances Barrett with Nina Buchanan, Debris Facility Pty Ltd., Hayley Forward, Brian Fuata, Del Lumanta and Sione Teumohenga
Commissioning Curator: Annika Kristensen

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne #accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

ACCA Exhibition Program for 2022

8 February 2022

The Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) is pleased to share the Exhibition Program for 2022, which includes:

  • The third edition of the Macfarlane Commissions, featuring major new works by eight Australian artists, including Nadia Hernández, Lucina Lane, Gian Manik, Betty Muffler, Jahnne Pasco-White, Jason Phu, JD Reforma and Esther Stewart. 
  • Frances Barrett’s much anticipated exhibition Meatus, postponed from 2020 due to COVID related lockdowns and part of the revered Suspended Moment: Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship, will open at ACCA in April.
  • The September launch of an extensive survey exhibition of works by Paul Yore in ACCA’s annual Influential Australian Artists series, and a large-scale exploration of contemporary data-driven society will be the focus of the 2022-23 Summer Big Picture exhibition.

Max Delany, ACCA Artistic Director said that, after two years of COVID related interruptions, it was with hope and focused enthusiasm that the ACCA team prepares to roll out the 2022 exhibition program. “We look forward to continuing to welcome visitors back into the gallery, and to a series of offsite and special programs that complement the creative program.”

Exhibition details follow below with more detailed Press Releases to follow. 

 

WHO’S AFRAID OF PUBLIC SPACE?
4 December 2021–20 March 2022

Who’s Afraid of Public Space? is a multifaceted project of exhibitions and programs exploring the role of public culture, the contested nature of public space, and the character and composition of public life. The exhibition continues ACCA’s Big Picture series, which explores contemporary art’s relation to wider social, cultural and political contexts.

Developed by ACCA’s curatorial team Max Delany, Miriam Kelly and Annika Kristensen, with the support of a curatorial advisory group, Who’s Afraid of Public Space? is organised according to a collaborative, dispersed, distributed structure, encouraging a polyphonic and polycentric understanding of our increasingly complex public realm. Taking place at ACCA over the summer months of 2021–22, the project also extends across Melbourne with a series of satellite exhibitions in collaboration with cultural partners, as well as installations, events and projects in the public realm. For further information and a full list of artists and contributors, visit https://acca.melbourne/whos-afraid-of-public-space/

 

FRANCES BARRETT: MEATUS
Presented as part of Suspended Moment: The Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship
2 April–19 June 2022

Commissioning curator: Annika Kristensen

Drawing on her background in performance, curating and collaborative models of making, Frances Barrett has expanded the solo commissioning focus of the Katthy Cavaliere Fellowship to present new sonic compositions and live performances by multiple artists. Alongside a major sound installation by Barrett, developed in collaboration with Hayley Forward and Brian Fuata, Barrett has curated specially commissioned sound compositions by artists Nina Buchanan, Del Lumanta and Sione Teumohenga, as well as a series of incursions by Debris Facility Ltd.

A ‘meatus’ is an opening or passage leading to the interior of the body. Encompassing a range of sensations and functions, the plurality of meatus becomes a way for Barrett to explore the practice of listening that decentres the ear to activate the entire body, attuned to both conscious responses and unconscious intensities. Barrett has conceived of ACCA’s four galleries as an immersive environment of sound and light – a performative staging of the body, which bleeds and leaks, and into which the audience may enter to consider the physical, sensual and critical experience of listening.

 

THE 2022 MACFARLANE COMMISSIONS
2 July–4 September 2022
Artists: Nadia Hernández, Lucina Lane, Gian Manik, Betty Muffler, Jahnne Pasco-White, Jason Phu, JD Reforma, Esther Stewart
Curators: Max Delany and Annika Kristensen

ACCA is pleased to present the third edition of The Macfarlane Commissions in 2022, continuing a multi-year partnership and biennial series of exhibitions designed to support the production and presentation of ambitious new projects by significant emerging and mid-career artists.

The 2022 edition of The Macfarlane Commissions will focus upon recent developments in contemporary painting, with a focus upon expanded painting practices in which the relations between art and life are intensified. The exhibition brings together new works by eight Australian artists, whose work collectively derives from a studio-based practice informed by the language of painting, with shared interests in the intersection and circulation between painting and other materials, forms and disciplines, including architecture, literature, performance, ecology, music and other relational activities.

 

PAUL YORE: WORD MADE FLESH
24 September–20 November 2022
Curator: Max Delany

A prominent queer artist whose iconoclastic works engage with the histories of ritual, queer identity, popular culture, nationalism and neo-liberalism, Paul Yore was born in Melbourne in 1987, completed his studies in painting, archaeology and anthropology at Monash University in 2010, and lives and works in Gippsland, Victoria. Yore’s garish yet playful works recast a vast array of found materials, images and texts into sexually and politically loaded tableaux, suggesting hybridity, contradictory meanings, or an overturning of stable categories altogether.

Paul Yore: Word Made Flesh will encompass the full scope of Yore’s work –appliquéd quilts and needlework, banners, painting, collage and assemblage – drawing on the vernacular of visionary and psychedelic art, Greco-Roman forms, medieval tapestries, the decorative excesses of rococo style and trash culture. The exhibition will be constructed as a gesamtkunstwerk, with an ambitious new immersive installation presented alongside selected works from the past fifteen years, accompanied by a major new monographic publication.  

 

BIG DATA
10 December 2022–19 March 2023
Curator: Miriam Kelly

Continuing ACCA’s ongoing Big Picture and ACCA Beyond Walls initiatives Big Data brings together artist-led projects that tackle key issues and challenges of our contemporary data-driven society. In Big Data, new commissions, existing works, performances and workshops address forms of activism against algorithmic violence, machine learning bias, and surveillance capitalism, as well as the role of data and technology in the climate crisis.

 

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art

111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people.

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 | kathall@ozemail.com.au

Who’s Afraid of Public Space?

4 December 2021 – 20 March 2022 

ACCA’s multifaceted project of exhibitions and programs exploring the role of public culture, the contested nature of public space, and the character and composition of public life, opens this coming Saturday, 4 December.

 

Who’s Afraid of Public Space? continues ACCA’s Big Picture series, which explores contemporary art’s relation to wider social, cultural and political contexts. Engaging contemporary art and cultural practices to consider critical ideas as to what constitutes public culture and to ask who is public space for, the exhibition is inspired by and seeks to animate recent global debates related to the incursion of private interests in the public sphere, the politics of land and place, and patterns of urban transformation, gentrification and technological change.

Through multiple installations and interventions, the exhibition reflects on the dynamic relations between urban design, safety and surveillance, as well as unsanctioned counter-positions of self-organisation, improvisation and play. Works in the exhibition also span themes of work, housing, democracy and social enterprise as they play out at the intersections and overlaps between private and public, corporate and state, profit and public good.

Promoting the role of the public gallery as a civic space, ACCA’s four galleries have been transformed into spaces for gathering, education, reflection and debate – including the major keynote commission of Ngargee Djeembana, a gathering space by N’arweet Carolyn Briggs AM in collaboration with Sarah Lynn Rees. Who’s Afraid of Public Space? also extends beyond the walls of ACCA with artists’ projects, installations and events taking place in public spaces across Melbourne and online, including:

  • ABORIGINAL LAND: SSID 2021, a new commission by interdisciplinary Taungurung artist Steven Rhall. Join participating wireless networks, including at ACCA, to engage in a spontaneous consideration of First Nations sovereignty
  • In a special one-off event on December 11, APHIDS screening of DESTINY 2019 will take place in the Cardigan House Car Park on Grattan Street. This moving-image work has been made in collaboration with gig economy workers and explores the personal and global experiences of precarious labour.
  • On a busy stretch of footpath on St Kilda Road, pedestrians will encounter a series of ambiguous public announcements, broadcast intermittently along the concourse between the Arts Centre and Hamer Hall.  The project, titled Public Announcements 2 2021, by Laresa Kosloff, draws on etiquette blogs and specialist websites to reflect on the language and expectations of the public realm. From February 4 to 20 March.
  • David Wadleton’s historical photographs of his inner-northern neighbourhood will be placed in the windows of a selection of High Street shops from Northcote through to Thornbury, from December through to March. The project, titled From noxious trades to boutique bars – a Northcote pictorial 1980-2021, traces the changing face of Melbourne’s inner-north
  • Based at Monash University, the cultural research collective XYX Lab are known for their data visualisation projects that address gendered experiences of violence, safety and public space.  From December through to March, an urban street poster and billboard project titled Keep Running will reflect on the experiences women and gender-diverse people across hundreds of sites around Melbourne.
  • Hoang Tran Nguyen’s Work, Worker 2022 invites the audience to participate in three karaoke sessions featuring a songbook of work and worker related songs, taking place in Footscray on Thursday 20 January, at University Square on Wednesday 16 February and at Westgate Park Friday 4 March
  • Beth Arnold and Sary Zananiri revisit their urban public sculpture Within Foundations 2012 in Officer in outer-metropolitan Melbourne. This  VicUrban Commission took the form of a sculpture/installation drawn from the floor plans of houses in nearby estates, which is now nestled within a thriving community. Ten years later, a new work, Building Foundations 2021- provides an opportunity to consider the changing nature of public art, local communities, and public and private housing development. Running over the summer months, visitors are also invited to join Arnold and Zananiri for a community picnic and discussion to share their insights on the work and life in the area on Saturday 12 February 2022.

A number of satellite exhibitions and events will be programmed and presented by cultural partners over the Australian summer months, including Abbotsford Convent, Arts Project Australia, Blak Dot Gallery, Bus Projects, Chunky Move, City of Melbourne Footscray Community Arts, Metro Tunnel Creative Program, Moreland City Council, and Testing Grounds.

Artists: 

Guled Abdulwasi, Idil Ali, APHIDS, Beth Arnold and Sary Zananiri, Atong Atem, Timmah Ball, Joey Barrilo, Tony Birch, N’arweet Carolyn Briggs and Sarah Lynn Rees, Jon Campbell, Michael Candy, Simona Castricum, Sonia Leber and David Chesworth, Chunky Move, Boris Cipusev, Nicola Cortese / Lauren Crockett / Stephanie Pahnis, Ross Coulter, Sophie Cunningham, Keg de Souza, Field Theory, Eleanor Jackson, Aarti Jadu, Natalie Jurrjens, Laresa Kosloff, Rhys Lee, Eugenia Lim, James MacSporren, Grace McQuilten and Amy Spiers with The Social Studio / Outer Urban Projects / Youthworx, John Meade, Clement Meadmore, Eden Menta, Kent Morris, Callum Morton, Jacqui Munoz, Jenny Ngo, James Nguyen and Victoria Pham, Tom Nicholson, Rose Nolan, Georgia Nowak, Open Spatial Workshop (Terri Bird, Bianca Hester, Natasha Johns-Messenger, Scott Mitchell), Oscar Perry and Esther Stewart, Kerrie Poliness, Reko Rennie, Steven Rhall, Roberta J Rich, Anthony Romangano, Morwenna Schenck, Sibling Architecture, Mikaela Stafford, Hoang Tran Nguyen, Christos Tsiolkas, Isadora Vaughan, David Wadelton, XYX Lab, Jenny Zhe Chang

Who’s Afraid of Public Space? has been programmed through a collective curatorial model, led by ACCA’s curatorial team, Max Delany, Annika Kristensen and Miriam Kelly, and developed in collaboration with a curatorial advisory group comprising Dr Marnie Badham, E. Flynn, Eugenia Lim, Dr Grace McQuilten, Dr Timothy Moore, Professor Nikos Papastergiadis, Nur Shkembi, and Jarra Karalinar Steel.

 

Further information about Who’s Afraid of Public Space?, including projects both at ACCA and offsite, is available at acca.melbourne

 

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
#accamelbourne #artstartsatacca

ACCA acknowledges the Kulin Nations as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, and we extend our respects to ancestors and Elders past and present, and to all First Nations people. 

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 | kathall@ozemail.com.au

Today – Jeremy Deller: Father and Son

JEREMY DELLER: FATHER AND SON
PRESENTED BY ACCA AT ST SAVIOUR’S CHURCH OF EXILES
6 OXFORD STREET, COLLINGWOOD, MELBOURNE
6 NOVEMBER 2021, MIDDAY TO MIDNIGHT

 

So Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of his own accord, but only what he sees the Father doing. For whatever the Father does, that the Son does likewise.”  — John 5:19

 

Jeremy Deller’s Father and Son is a time-based sculptural installation which takes the form of public vigil, as an invitation for the public to bear witness to, and reflect upon, questions of power, influence and generational change, represented through the allegorical depiction of a father and son, cast in the soft light of remembrance.

Father and Son is presented at an historical moment of social change, in which existing power structures are increasingly being scrutinised as part of public discourse. Through the lens of art history, religion and popular culture, Father and Son explores questions of generational change, and the legacies we leave for future generations.

Of the new work Jeremy Deller has said: “The bible has been the greatest inspiration in making this work with its stories of conflict, families and transformation. It’s a book I absorbed as a child and since then I seem to have spent most of my life wandering around churches and museums. To me in some ways they are interchangeable spaces, in which the boundary between the sacred and profane is blurred”.

Max Delany, ACCA Artistic Director/CEO, said: “ACCA is delighted to be working with Jeremy Deller on the artist’s latest work, an ambitious, one-day only sculptural installation to be presented in a deconsecrated church in the Melbourne suburb of Collingwood. Deller’s works have consistently redefined the role and form of contemporary art and have engaged some of the most important contemporary issues of our times. While often ephemeral in nature, in the form of performances and one-off events, his projects endure through the conversations, imagination and the resonant engagement they evoke”.

Following an extended period of dialogue with the artist, Annika Kristensen, ACCA’s Curator-at-Large says: “It has been a true pleasure to work with Jeremy Deller to realise this project, which welcomes visitors to contemplate a moment of profound generational, social and structural change. Situated in an ecclesiastical context, the work pays tribute to institutions larger than the individuals represented as father and son – including religion, media, politics and family – calling into question our own relationship to such systems, while encouraging reflection upon our individual agency in the world.”

Jeremy Deller is a Turner Prize-winning artist working across video, sculpture, installation and events. Father and Son is a major time-based sculptural work and the artist’s first commission in Australia. It follows Deller’s long history of internationally renowned projects across video, sculpture, installation and events, including We’re here because we’re here 2016, a commemorative event that took place across Britain on the 100th anniversary of the first day of the Battle of the Somme, and The Battle of Orgreave 2001, a site-specific performance that recreated the clash between police and miners during the Miners’ Strike of 1984-85. In 2013, Deller represented Great Britain with the exhibition English Magic at the 55th Venice Biennale, following the career retrospective Joy in People, presented at the Hayward Gallery, London in 2012.

 

Jeremy Deller: Father and Son
Saturday 6 November 2021, midday–midnight
St Saviour’s Church of Exiles
6 Oxford Street
Collingwood, Melbourne, 3066

Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
acca.melbourne
#JeremyDellerFatherAndSon #ACCAMelbourne

For further media information:
Katrina Hall 0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past, present and emerging, and to all First Nations people.

Jeremy Deller: Father and Son

PRESENTED BY ACCA AT ST SAVIOUR’S CHURCH OF EXILES

6 OXFORD STREET, COLLINGWOOD, MELBOURNE

6 NOVEMBER 2021, MIDDAY TO MIDNIGHT

 

So Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, the Son can do nothing of his own accord, but only what he sees the Father doing. For whatever the Father does, that the Son does likewise.”

— John 5:19

 

Jeremy Deller’s Father and Son is a time-based sculptural installation which takes the form of public vigil, as an invitation for the public to bear witness to, and reflect upon, the slow decline and symbolic erosion of power, as represented through the allegorical depiction of a father and son, cast in the soft light of remembrance.

Father and Son is presented at an historical moment of social change, in which existing power structures are increasingly being scrutinised as part of public discourse. Through the lens of art history, religion and popular culture, Father and Son explores questions of generational change, and the legacies we leave for future generations.

Of the new work Jeremy Deller has said: “The bible has been the greatest inspiration in making this work with its stories of conflict, families and transformation. It’s a book I absorbed as a child and since then I seem to have spent most of my life wandering around churches and museums. To me in some ways they are interchangeable spaces, in which the boundary between the sacred and profane is blurred”.

Max Delany, ACCA Artistic Director/CEO, said: “ACCA is delighted to be working with Jeremy Deller on the artist’s latest work, an ambitious, one-day only sculptural installation to be presented in a deconsecrated church in the Melbourne suburb of Collingwood. Deller’s works have consistently redefined the role and form of contemporary art and have engaged some of the most important contemporary issues of our times. While often ephemeral in nature, in the form of performances and one-off events, his projects endure through the conversations, imagination and the resonant engagement they evoke”.

Following an extended period of dialogue with the artist, Annika Kristensen, ACCA’s Curator-at-Large says: “It has been a true pleasure to work with Jeremy Deller to realise this project, which welcomes visitors to contemplate a moment of profound generational, social and structural change. Situated in an ecclesiastical context, the work pays tribute to institutions larger than the individuals represented as father and son – including religion, media, politics and family – calling into question our own relationship to such systems, while encouraging reflection upon our individual agency in the world.”

Jeremy Deller is a Turner Prize-winning artist working across video, sculpture, installation and events. Father and Son is a major time-based sculptural work and the artist’s first commission in Australia. It follows Deller’s long history of internationally renowned projects across video, sculpture, installation and events, including We’re here because we’re here 2016, a commemorative event that took place across Britain on the 100th anniversary of the first day of the Battle of the Somme, and The Battle of Orgreave 2001, a site-specific performance that recreated the clash between police and miners during the Miners’ Strike of 1984-85. In 2013, Deller represented Great Britain with the exhibition English Magic at the 55th Venice Biennale, following the career retrospective Joy in People, presented at the Hayward Gallery, London in 2012.

 

Jeremy Deller: Father and Son
Saturday 6 November 2021, midday–midnight
St Saviour’s Church of Exiles
6 Oxford Street
Collingwood, Melbourne, 3066

 Australian Centre for Contemporary Art
acca.melbourne

#JeremyDellerFatherAndSon #ACCAMelbourne

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
0421153046 | kathall@ozemail.com.au

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past, present and emerging, and to all First Nations people.

Announcing ACCA’s Summer Season – Who’s Afraid of Public Space?

4 December 2021 – 20 March 2022

Over the summer season, ACCA will present a multifaceted project of exhibitions and programs exploring the role of public culture, the contested nature of public space, and the character and composition of public life. Taking place at ACCA, the project will also extend across the city through a series of satellite exhibitions in collaboration with cultural partners – Abbotsford Convent, Arts Project Australia, Blak Dot Gallery, Bus Projects, City of Melbourne, Footscray Community Arts, Metro Tunnel Creative Program and Testing Grounds – as well as installations and projects in the public realm.

Who’s Afraid of Public Space? continues ACCA’s Big Picture exhibition series which explores contemporary art’s relation to wider social, cultural and political contexts. This major exhibition and research project will engage contemporary art and cultural practices to consider critical ideas as to what constitutes public culture and ask who is public space for?

Developed by ACCA curators alongside a curatorial advisory group and a diverse group of collaborators and partners, and informed by a series of workshops, think tanks and public projects, the exhibition will be hosted at ACCA as well as extending beyond the walls of the gallery into public space itself, with artist projects and interventions occurring at partnering venues and in the public realm across Melbourne over the summer months.

ACCA Artistic Director/CEO Max Delany said that “Who’s Afraid of Public Space? will explore and animate recent debates and phenomena related to the increasingly contested nature of the public sphere; the dynamic relations between urban design, surveillance, regulation and gentrification; as well as ideas of place, community, collectivity and the commons.”

While the exhibition was first conceived over two years ago, the pandemic has amplified global discussions around the character of public and private space. As Delany notes: “Over the past eighteen months many of us have conducted our working and social lives from bedrooms and living rooms, and at the same time we have developed a more intense relationship with our local neighbourhoods. Who’s Afraid of Public Space? also explores these developments and the radical shift from the civic space of the public square to the virtual space of the digital commons”.

“As we emerge from separations caused by lockdowns, we are excited to present a program that encourages dialogue with ACCA as an institution and our communities and wider publics. The exhibition also encourages the idea of the city as a studio in which artists create new perspectives, connections and ways of being together,” Delany said.

 

ACCA as a CIVIC Space

In considering the role of the gallery as a public space, ACCA will open its four galleries up to the public as civic spaces to be programmed and occupied for multiple uses by diverse communities. Artworks and new commissions will be presented across the galleries, alongside a series of gathering, education and common rooms, providing a conversational starting point to the extended exhibition, while also reflecting on the theme of public space more broadly.

ACCA’s four galleries will take the form of:

  • Gathering Space: Ngargee Djeembana, a large topographical installation and gathering space in ACCA’s main exhibition hall designed by N’arweet Carolyn Briggs AM and architect Sarah Lynn Rees which explores the materiality of public space and Country. This space will be available to be booked for community events, programs and gatherings throughout the duration of the exhibition.
  • A dedicated Education Space: Making Art Public, curated by artist and ACCA Educator Andrew Atchison, presents models, maquettes and concepts for significant works of public art by leading Australian artists, as a stimulus for students and members of the public to consider new forms of art in public space. The Education Space will also host artists in residence, school programs and education and making workshops. Students can propose and design their own public artworks using an array of media and techniques.
  • Reading Space: The Common Room, a dedicated reading lounge offering books and digital resources related to urban design, architecture and public art projects. Designed by Nicola Cortese, Lauren Crockett and Stephanie Pahnis, the space will be available for small community meetings such as book groups, readings, university tutorials and other gatherings.
  • Project Space: The Hoarding, designed by Sibling Architecture, will bring together documentation of ACCA’s off-site program, and partner-led projects, while also considering the polyphonic language, materiality and expansive nature of public space.

 

Beyond the gallery walls
Who’s Afraid of Public Space? will extend beyond the walls of ACCA with a program of artists’ projects, interventions and events presented in public spaces across Melbourne, from billboards and public announcement speakers to suburban shopfronts, carparks, public squares and housing developments.

Participating artists and artistic collaborations include Guled AbdulwasiAPHIDS, Beth Arnold and Sary Zananiri, Jon Campbell, Michael Candy, Simona Castricum, Keg de Souza, Field Theory, Laresa Kosloff, Callum Morton, Steven Rhall, Hoang Tran Nguyen, David Wadelton, and XYX Lab create engaging, incidental and often surprising works – including interventions into public architecture, broadcast and communications systems, guided walking tours, excursions and karaoke performances.

Satellite exhibitions and events
A program of exhibitions and events created by landmark Melbourne cultural organisations and arts initiatives, including The Abbotsford Convent, Arts Project Australia, Blak Dot GalleryBus Projects, City of Melbourne, Footscray Community Arts, Metro Tunnel Creative Program, and Testing Grounds will also explore and elaborate upon the theme.

“Off-site and satellite programs offer a range of diverse perspectives on the subject of public space, whilst also contributing to the reactivation of the city in the wake of Melbourne’s extended lockdowns,” Max Delany said. “In the spirit of openness, inclusion and civic generosity, programs are free and have been designed for audiences to gather together to participate in the exchange of knowledge and ideas.”

 

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE 

  • Members of the public and community groups are also invited to hold free events or gatherings at ACCA throughout Who’s Afraid of Public Space? The public bookings for the Gathering space: Ngargee Djeembana and the Reading Space: The Common Room, will open online from Tuesday 7 December. Bookings will be welcome during gallery hours throughout the summer months.
  • Documentation of Who’s Afraid of Public Space? Think Tanks, projects, conferences, and events held in the lead-up to the project’s December launch – including Kent Morris: Never alone 2020, Six Walks podcast series with Idil Ali, Timmah Ball, Tony Birch, Sophie Cunningham, Eleanor Jackson, Christos Tsiolkas, and Kerrie Poliness: Parliament steps walking drawing 2021, are available at: https://acca.melbourne/exhibition/whos-afraid-of-public-space/

 

Who’s Afraid of Public Space? has been led by ACCA’s curatorial team – Artistic Director Max Delany,  Curator-at-Large Annika Kristensen, and Senior Curator Miriam Kelly – working in collaboration with a curatorial advisory group comprised of the following members:

  • Dr Marnie Badham, Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Art, RMIT University;
  • Eugenia Flynn, Writer, arts worker, community organiser, and PhD Candidate at Queensland University of Technology
  • Eugenia Lim, Artist, editor and Artistic Director of Aphids
  • Dr Grace McQuilten, Lecturer in Art History and Theory, and Leader of the Contemporary Art and Social Transformation Research Group, School of Art, RMIT University
  • Dr Timothy Moore, Director of Sibling Architects, lecturer at Monash University Art, Design and Architecture, publisher and curator of Melbourne Design Week
  • Professor Nikos Papastergiadis, School of Culture and Communication; and Director of the Research Unit for Public Culture, University of Melbourne
  • Nur Shkembi, Artist, curator and PhD candidate, University of Melbourne
  • Jarra Karalinar Steel, Artist, First Peoples Arts officer at City of Port Phillip, creative and cultural consultant, and Master of Arts (Art in Public Space), RMIT University

For further information and regular updates: https://acca.melbourne/exhibition/whos-afraid-of-public-space/

 

Artist List:

Guled Abdulwasi, Idil Ali, APHIDS, Beth Arnold and Sary Zananiri, Atong Atem, Timmah Ball, Joey Barrilo, Tony Birch, N’Arweet Carolyn Briggs and Sarah Lynn Rees, Jon Campbell, Michael Candy, Simona Castricum, David Chesworth and Sonia Leber, Boris Cipusev, Greg Cooper, Nicola Cortese / Lauren Crockett / Stephanie Pahnis, Ross CoulterSophie Cunningham, Keg de Souza, Field Theory, Eleanor Jackson, Aarti Jadu, Natalie Jurrjens, Laresa Kosloff, Rhys Lee, Eugenia Lim, James MacSporren, Grace McQuilten and Amy Spiers with The Social Studio / Outer Urban Projects / Youthworx, John Meade, Eden Menta, Kent Morris, Callum Morton, Jenny Ngo, James Nguyen and Victoria Pham, Tom Nicholson, Rose Nolan, Georgia Nowak, Open Spatial WorkshopOskar Perry and Ester Stewart, Kerrie Poliness, Reko Rennie, Steven Rhall, Roberta J Rich, Anthony Romangano, Morwenna Schenck, Sibling Architects, Mikaela Stafford, Hoang Tran Nguyen, Christos Tsiolkas, David Wadelton, XYX Lab, Jenny Zhe Chang

 

AUSTRALIAN CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART
111 Sturt Street, Southbank VIC 3006
Melbourne, Australia
Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am–5pm, Weekends 11am–5pm Entry free
acca.melbourne

#ACCAMelbourne #ArtStartsAtACCA

ACCA acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as sovereign custodians of the land on which we work and welcome visitors, who have cared for Country and culture over millennia, and continue to do so. We extend our respect to ancestors and Elders past, present and emerging, and to all First Nations people.

 

For further media information:
Katrina Hall
Publicity/Communications
0421153046 kathall@ozemail.com.au